Quick Answer: What Happens If Shin Splints Go Untreated?

How do I stop getting shin splints?

8 Tips to Prevent Shin SplintsStretch your calves and hamstrings.

Avoid sudden increases in physical activity.

Exercise on softer surfaces when possible.

Strengthen your foot and the arch of your foot.

Strengthen your hip muscles.

Buy new athletic shoes that are right for you.

Stay at a healthy body weight.More items….

Can shin splints be permanent?

The Long Term Recurring shin splints are common, and, without full treatment, there is a possibility for permanent injury. It’s also important to not self-diagnose shin splints, as they can sometimes mask more severe injuries, like a stress fracture. Shin splints also take much longer to heal than you might think.

When should you see a doctor about shin splints?

You should talk to a doctor about your shin splints if: The pain from the shin splints continues even after you ice, rest, and take pain relievers. You think the pain is from something that isn’t shin splints. The swelling is not going down.

Can anything be done for shin splints?

If your shin splints don’t get better, or if they come back, your doctor may suggest you see a physical therapist. They can treat issues in your legs or the way you move that could cause the problem. A therapist can also help ease the pain and guide your return to sport.

Do shin splints hurt when resting?

You have pain over the front part of your lower leg. You may have pain during exercise, at rest, or both. Stress fractures of the tibia cause pain directly over your shinbone. It will hurt to touch the part of the bone that is fractured.

How long do shin splints take to heal?

After 2 to 4 weeks, if the pain is gone, you can start your usual activities. Increase your activity level slowly. If the pain returns, stop exercising right away. Know that shin splints can take 3 to 6 months to heal.

Should you massage shin splints?

Shin Splints Massage At first you might feel some soreness around your shinbone or light swelling and tenderness in your lower leg. The pain might appear during exercise, afterwards, or it might be constant. No matter when you’re affected by shin splints, massage can help.

What exercise is good for shin splints?

6 Exercises That Help Prevent Shin SplintsToe Curl. Stand with feet hip-width apart and right foot on a towel. … Monster Walk. Start standing with feet shoulder-width apart and place a resistance band around your thighs. … Heel Drop. … Single-Legged Bridge.

Do shin splints show up on xray?

Medical imaging X-rays, bone scan, and MRI are often negative with shin splints, but they may help to differentiate shin splints from stress fractures. X-rays may demonstrate some generalized periosteal thickening.

Can shin splints be serious?

Also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, shin splints can be painful and disrupt training regimes. However, they are not a serious condition and may be alleviated with some simple home remedies. Shin splints are characterized by pain in the lower leg, on the front, outside, or inside of the leg.

What actually is shin splints?

The term “shin splints” refers to pain along the shin bone (tibia) — the large bone in the front of your lower leg. Shin splints are common in runners, dancers and military recruits.

Do shin splints hurt to the touch?

These are the most common symptoms of shin splints: Pain felt on the front and outside of the shin. It’s first felt when the heel touches the ground during running. In time, pain becomes constant and the shin is painful to the touch.

What happens if you don’t treat shin splints?

Shin splints are a very common overuse injury. With rest and ice, most people recover from shin splints without any long-term health problems. However, if left untreated, shin splints do have the potential to develop into a tibial stress fracture.

Is it OK to walk with shin splints?

You don’t need to stop running completely with shin splints, as long as you stop when the pain starts. Instead, just cut back on how much you run. Run about half as often as you did before, and walk more instead. Wear compression socks or compression wraps, or apply kinesiology tape to prevent pain while running.